HOW MUCH DOES A FRENCH BULLDOG COST?

Small, expressive face, and a great personality, it’s no wonder that Frenchies are one of the most popular dog breeds in North America.

Due to their insane popularity, and top quality being in short supply, French bulldogs have become harder and harder to find. Like any rarity in life, higher demand dictates a higher price. If you’ve done any preliminary research you’ve probably noticed French bulldogs are an expensive investment. Of course, supply isn’t the only reason a premium has been put on French bulldogs. So the question is: why else do French bulldogs cost so much?

Blue Pied 1 week old Frenchie. Registered with My Pawesome Frenchie as My Pawesome Gum Drop
My Pawesome Gum Drop – 1 week old Blue Pied

In order to answer that question, we have to acknowledge the fact that not all dog breeders are the same. Some aren’t interested in providing the best environment for their pups and some are not using best practices when it comes to breeding procedures. But we aren’t going to get into that. For the purposes of our discussion, we’re going to look at the costs associated with a reputable breeder. So let’s pull back the curtain as My Pawesome Frenchie reveals some of the overhead a reputable breeder incurs, and give you a better understanding of cost.

Diet. You may think you can get away with table scraps and underperforming dog food, but if you want your French bulldog to be at his or her best a high-quality diet is essential. My Pawesome Frenchie adheres to a raw food diet based on 80% meat, 10% Bone, 10% Organ. 5% of the organ intake is nutrition from the liver. The diet also consists of Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids – such as fish oils – to moisturize, lubricate, and rejuvenate your French bulldog’s skin and body. This is what our pups are feeding on after weaning, and before they become a part of your family. They never see kibble a day in their life.

Füli, Blue French Bulldog preparing to eat raw dog food.

The Right Parent Choosing the right parents is always based on two things: Health and pedigree. You’ll want a breeder that breeds their pups with an accredited body. In Canada, this would be the Canadian Kennel Club. Our most recent additions to the My Pawesome Frenchie family are an example of this with Kiwi and Astro both being CKC registered and DNA tested. Between getting the right parents, registration, paperwork, and lab test results a breeder will usually expect to pay  $10,000-$15,000 CAD – sometimes even more.

Kiwi- Blue Frenchie the day she was artificially inseminated, sitting in front of wood logs.

Puppies are on the Way. The pregnancy period averages 60 – 63 days. Just like any pregnancy, a visit to the veterinarian is needed for prenatal checkups and bloodwork. During the actual labor and birthing process, the Frenchie will most likely need a c-section. 80% of Frenchies are born with a c-section due to their large heads and narrow birth canals. A breeder will usually incur a cost ranging from $3000 – $6000 for a scheduled c-section. However, like anything else in life, emergencies happen. If a breeder’s female decides to go into labor after regular business hours an emergency c-sections cost more ranging from $4000 – $8000. Along with these are the added expenses of pain/antibiotic medications and whelping supplies. 

Kiwi, Blue French Bulldog the day she had her x-ray done. The vet confirmed 7 puppies. Kiwi is sitting in front of 7 potatoes with ID collars.
Kiwi was anticipating 7 little potato’s but was blessed with 9 that day she went into labor

Puppy vaccine and registration. To keep your puppy healthy and free of common avoidable ailments, we strongly suggest a vaccination schedule. This will protect your little ones from Rabies, Bordetella, Lyme disease, and many more. My Pawesome Frenchie takes care of your pup’s first round of shots. We encourage you to talk to your veterinarian about the importance of vaccination and keep a vaccination booklet for your records. MPF will also provide those records and all necessary documentation upon homing.

Lastly, dog breeding is more of a science than an art and even though you can learn a lot from reading and researching, the best thing for any potential French bulldog parent is to find someone with experience to guide you through the process. If you’d like to get to know more about available pups with My Pawesome Frenchie fill out the form here.

Peter K and Lorenzo photoshoot. Lorenzo is a Blue Tan French Bulldog.

* First round of shots include distemper and Parvovirus( 6-8 weeks), Second round of shots is DHPP ( Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, and parvovirus(10 weeks), Last round of shots at 12+ is DHPP and Rabies.

Optional vaccines are Bordatela, lyme, and lepto. 

Before the puppy goes home at 8 weeks, the pup will go for their wellness check, get its first round of shots, plus a certificate of good health.

Peter Kramm

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